46 Countries are Getting Over 60% of Electricity from Renewable Energies

BKarl-Friedrich Lenz 
March 18, 2013

One anti-renewable talking point often heard is that it is impossible to run an electricity system with 100% renewable.

One way (actually the only way) to prove that wrong is to point to an example where exactly that has been done.

The following list of countries getting 60% or more of their electricity from renewable energy was compiled from data at the excellent CO2scorecard site, which is mostly from 2008.  With some substantial investment in renewable energy in the years since, if anything, those percentages should have gone up, if they were not at 100 percent in the first place. I have looked at most of the countries listed there (except some very small ones). Countries getting 100 percent or close (over 95%) are in bold.

Especially the case of Paraguay is noteworthy. It doesn’t only get 100% of its own electricity from hydro, but actually exports 90 percent of its production, so in relation to consumption of electricity it produces actually about 1,000 percent renewable. I think this is a world record.

I also noted in the process that one country has even more nuclear share than France, though I won’t mention the name here. A list of countries with more than 60 percent nuclear would be very short. None have over 90 percent.

Albania (100% hydro in 2008).

Angola (96.45% hydro in 2008)

Austria (73.86% renewable in 2009, 12.5% of that non hydro)

Belize (90.91% hydro in 2008) Update: REEGLE says only about 80%.

Bhutan (99.86% hydro in 2008)

Brazil (88.88% renewable with 4.93 non hydro in 2009)

Burundi (100% hydro in 2008)

Cameroon (77.31% hydro in 2008)

Canada (61.95% renewable, with 1.86% non hydro in 2009)

Central African Republic (81.25% renewable in 2008)

Columbia (85.67% hydro in 2008)

Congo (82.22% renewable in 2008)

Costa Rica (93.11% renewable in 2008)

DPR Korea (61.86%  hydro in 2008)

DR Congo (99.46% hydro in 2008)

Ecuador (64.12% renewable in 2008, with 2.21% non hydro)

El Salvador (62.24% renewable in 2008, with 26.92 non hydro)

Ethiopia (88.17% renewable in 2008, with 0.27% non hydro)

Fiji (68.04% renewable in 2008)

Georgia (85.52% hydro in 2008)

Ghana (75.03% hydro in 2008)

Guatemala (61.31% renewable, with 17.5 non hydro in 2008)

Iceland (100% renewable, with 26.27% geothermal in 2009).

Kenya (62.59% renewable, with 21.06% non hydro in 2008)

Kyrgyzstan (90.85% hydro in 2008)

Lao PDR (92.46% hydro in 2008)

Latvia (62.23% renewable with 1.96% non hydro in 2008)

Lesotho (100% hydro in 2008)

Madagascar (66.67% hydro in 2008)

Malawi (86.31% hydro in 2008)

Mozambique (99.87% hydro in 2008)

Myanmar (62.05% hydro in 2008)

Namibia (70.91% hydro in 2008)

Nepal (99.67% hydro in 2008)

New Zealand (72.52% renewable, including 15.42% non hydro in 2009)

Norway (97.11% renewable, including 0.93% non hydro in 2009)

Paraguay (100.00% hydro in 2008), exporting 90% of generated electricity (54.91 TWh in 2008)

Peru (60.53% renewable, including 1.47% non hydro in 2008)

Sweden (60.42% renewable, including 10.58% non hydro in 2009)

Tajikistan (98.25% hydro in 2008)

Tanzania (61.45% hydro in 2008)

Uganda (74.77% hydro in 2008)

Uruguay (61.98% renewable, with 9.33 non hydro in 2008)

Venezuela (69.57% hydro in 2008)

Zambia (99.69% hydro in 2008)

Update: Some comments at this Cleantechnica post have kindly noted this list.

Update April 2013: Portugal joins the list for the first quarter of 2013, with 70% renewable, 27% of which came from wind.

- See more at: http://k.lenz.name/LB/?p=6525#sthash.wk77r1Pu.dpuf

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