21 graphs that show America’s health-care prices are ludicrous

By Ezra Klein
Washington Post, March 26, 2013

Every year, the International Federation of Health Plans — a global insurance trade association that includes more than 100 insurers in 25 countries — releases survey data showing the prices that insurers are actually paying for different drugs, devices, and medical services in different countries. And every year, the data is shocking.

The IFHP just released the data for 2012. And yes, once again, the numbers are shocking.

This is the fundamental fact of American health care: We pay much, much more than other countries do for the exact same things. For a detailed explanation of why, see this article. But this post isn’t about the why. It’s about the prices, and the graphs.

One note: Prices in the United States are expressed as a range. There’s a reason for that. In other countries, prices are set centrally and most everyone, no matter their region or insurance arrangement, pays pretty close to the same amount. In the United States, each insurer negotiates its own prices, and different insurers end up paying wildly different amounts. That’s what Steven Brill’s explosive article was about, and it’s why you see U.S. prices expressed as a range rather than a single number.

angiogram office visit

angioplasty

bypass surgery

hip replacement knee replacement C section normal delivery appendectomy hospital day MRI CT scan abdomenhip prosthesis colonoscopy nexium lipitor nasonex cymbalta vytorin celebrex

After all these graphs, this final graph shouldn’t be a surprise.gdp health care duh

Further reading:

- Why an MRI costs $1,080 in America and $280 in France.

Share This

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>